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  • Root cause
    The original event(s), action(s), and/or condition(s) generating (directly or in cascade) an actual or potential undesirable condition, situation, nonconformity or failure.
    – Note: There are often several root causes for one problem


  • Root cause analysis (RCA)
    It is the process of identifying all the causes (root causes and contributing causes) that have or may have generated an undesirable condition, situation, nonconformity or failure. It is a structured process that strives for investigating where the problem is coming from and what are the likely factors that are at the origin of it. The analysis covers the identification of (1) all the causes that have -or may have- produced the problem, (2) their causal chain to the problem occurrence and (3) their prioritization depending on the degree of contribution to the problem, the level of criticality of the effects they produce and finally the degree of difficulty to define feasible solutions to eradicate them. 
    The methods for addressing the root cause analysis are multiple, some of them are: 
The Events and Causal Factors Charting which is based on the representation of events and the conditions that caused them into a time line.
The Tree or Cause-and-Effect Diagrams - category on which it is included the Ishikawa Fishbone Diagram.  
The 5Ws (five-Whys).
The Fault Tree Analysis which is a quantitative causal diagram used to identify possible failures in a system. 

Sources

- “Collaborativeproblem solving within supply chains by Juan Camilo Romero Bejarano. PhD Thesis. 

    Full document available at http://ethesis.inp-toulouse.fr.

- 8D Training by Axsens bte.

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  • Root cause eradication
    The solution phase of a problem solving method aims at eradicating the root causes that have been identified and validated during the analysis phase and thereby preventing the problem from reoccurring. In doing so this phase attempts to define, prioritize, select, implement and measure the effectiveness of a set of permanent corrective actions. These actions set a permanent basis for continuous improvement since they tackle the true root causes of the problems and not the apparent symptoms of the problem effects.

Useful linksRootcause analysis and problem solving” by IAQG.

Sources

- “Collaborativeproblem solving within supply chains by Juan Camilo Romero Bejarano. PhD Thesis. 

    Full document available at http://ethesis.inp-toulouse.fr.

- 8D Training by Axsens bte.

Back to glossary

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